CHAPTER – I INTRODUCTION Stress is a common problem that affects almost all of us at some point in our lives

CHAPTER – I
INTRODUCTION
Stress is a common problem that affects almost all of us at some point in our lives. Learning to identify when you are under stress, what is stressing you, and different ways of coping with stress can greatly improve both your mental and physical well being.

Stress management is a wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person’s level of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of improving everyday functioning. In this context, the term ‘stress’ refers only to a stress with significant negative consequences, or distress in the terminology advocated by Hans Selve, rather than what he calls eustress, a stress whose consequences are helpful or otherwise.

1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
Selection of the problem or identifying it is the first step of research. The term “problem” means an issue to be examined. To formulate a research problem it is necessary to be creative and imaginative. The research topic is ”A study on stress coping strategies of the employees in Kothari Sugar Factory Kattur, Trichy”. The research problem of this study is to identifying the stress coping strategies of the employees. Every human being faces stress in personal life as well as in work life. In the current scenario, due to the many new technologies, mergers, different cultures, and changes in business environment, it is difficult for the individual to cope with the challenge. This leads to stress and consequently lead to poor performance in the work place, ill health etc.
1.3 GENERAL OBJECTIVE:
The general objective of the study is to investigate the various aspects of stress among the employees in Kothari Sugar Factory Kattur Trichy District and the strategies adopted by them to cope with stress causing environment.
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
To know the personal profile of the employees as a background for the study of stress management.

To understand the factors associated with stress among the employees;
To study the employees’ perception of the organization and the level of satisfaction of their expectations.

To identify the major causes and consequences and the symptoms of stress among the employees.

To describe the stress management practices prevalent in the organization,
To offer some suggestions towards better stress management in the organization.
1.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY
The present study will be helpful to the organization to determine the levels of motivation of employees. It put forth the wants of the employees of various levels related to their work place in the form of feedback and thus it helps the organization to promise interpersonal relations, appreciation, recognition of work and security of job which lead to the smooth in the organizational environment and better productivity. It is highly useful to the company in case of fixing incentives. It identifies the growth and development of employee. It is helpful for analysis the job relatedness, promotion etc.
1.7 SOURCE OF DATA COLLECTION
Primary Sources: Primary data for the study is collected through a Questionnaire in the field.
Secondary Source: The secondary data is collected through books, journals, internet, articles and other studies.

The researcher has collected both primary and secondary data through questionnaire and published records respectively.
1.8 TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION
The researcher has chosen the questionnaire method as the tool for data collection from among various available tools in research. The type of questionnaire selected for this study is a structured one and the respondents were requested to answer the questions. Since the respondents are the employees of Kothari Sugar Factory India limited. The researcher preferred the questionnaire method as a tool.
1.9 STATISTICAL TOOLS
Data collected from the field are edited and coded. The data were fed into the computer and are analyzed using SPSS Software and Statistical techniques. Statistical Methods are mathematical technique used to facilitate the interpretation of numerical data a secured from the samples. Hence the researcher proposes the use of tools such as frequency distribution, percentage, one way ANOVA, T- test and Chi-Square test for analyzing and interpreting the data.
1.10 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
The study on stress coping strategies conducted at (p) Kothari Sugar Factory ltd Company has the following limitations:
1. The researcher could not guarantee that all the respondents had given only their real feelings and responses without prejudice for the questions.

2. The result especially the finding of the study cannot be applied to other organization without appropriate modification.

3. Some respondents were too busy to answer. The questions were not properly understood and answered by them.

4. Time paucity and resource constraints are the other limiting factors of the study.

CHAPTER – II
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
2.2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Buddeberg-Fischer, B; Klaghofer, R; Stamm, M; Siegrist, J; Buddeberg, in their book titled “Work stress and reduced health in young physicians: prospective evidence from Swiss residents” (2008) Job stress, investigated by the effort–reward model in various working environments in different countries, has been widely reported, yet studies addressing physicians are lacking. The present study investigated the perceived job stress, its association with the amount of working hours, and its impact on young physicians’ self-reported health and their satisfaction with life during residency. Stress at work in young physicians, especially when being experienced over a longer period in postgraduate training, has to be a matter of concern because of its negative impact on health and life satisfaction and the risk of developing symptoms of burnout in the long run.

Sang, Katherine J. C.; Dainty, Andrew R. J.; Ison, Stephen G. Intheir research titled. “Gender: a risk factor for occupational stress in the architectural profession” (2007)There is significant evidence that those working in construction are at risk of poor health and well?being due to long working hours, job insecurity, poor work–life balance, low professional worth and temporary teams. There is also a disparate body of evidence which highlights the discrimination experienced by women working in the construction industry. A self?completion questionnaire was used to assess job satisfaction, physical health problems, work–life conflict and turnover intentions. Female respondents reported significantly lower overall job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of insomnia and constipation, work–life conflict and turnover intentions. Although further work is needed to understand the causal relationships between variables and the nature of the female architects’ dissatisfactions and concerns, the suggestion that women working in the architectural profession are at risk of poorer occupational health and well?being than their male colleagues will be of concern to a profession seeking to embrace diversity.

Mikolajczak, Moïra; Menil, ClémentineLuminetOlivier in their article “Explaining the protective effect of trait emotional intelligence regarding occupational stress: Exploration of emotional labor processes” (2007) This paper aims at understanding the processes explaining the protective effect of trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) regarding occupational stress. The study focuses on a widespread occupational stressor: emotional labor (EL). EL refers to the act of managing emotions and emotional expressions in order to be consistent with organizational ‘display rules’, defined as the organizationally required emotions during interpersonal service transactions. As these display rules interact with employees spontaneous feelings, they regularly induce a clash between inner/real and required feelings. Different strategies exist to cope with this dissonance, with either beneficial or deleterious outcomes regarding psychological and physical health. The hypothesis underlying this study was that individuals varying in the level of trait EI would use different EL strategies, with different outcomes in terms of burnout and somatic complaints. Implications of these results for research, theory and practice are discussed.

Upson, John W.; Ketchen Jr., David J.; Ireland, R. Duane in their article titled “Managing Employee Stress: A Key to the Effectiveness of Strategic Supply Chain Management” (2007) The authors draw upon their extensive supply chain research and experience to model supply chain success. The model highlights the potentially dangerous role of stress among supply chain members, and how this stress can be addressed. After identifying supply chain activities that create employee stress, we discuss how certain executive initiatives can reduce stress. These initiatives are designed to assist employees in thinking strategically and embracing new responsibilities. We conclude that by using the suggested initiatives, both employees’ quality of life and the organization’s performance can improve
Elisa f topper (2007) has entitled in the article it aims to help people understand the impact that stress has on library employees and the library as an organization. This article is based on literature reviews and commentary on this important topic that is not frequently addressed in the library as workplace. Library workers are under stress and the library as an organization needs to provide training in how to deal with this issue. Strategies for reducing stress are outlined. This article identifies stress in the library workplace and the importance of stress on employees and will be of interest to those that work within that field.

Wated, Guillermo; Sanchez, Juan I., in their research titled “Role of Accent as a Work Stressor on Attitudinal and Health-Related Work Outcomes”,(2006) the research has indicated that perceived discrimination can be a powerful work stressor influencing employees’ outcomes beyond well-documented work stressors such as role ambiguity and role conflict. However, the incremental predictive validity of perceived discrimination based on foreign accent as a work stressor remains poorly understood. It was proposed that perceived discrimination based on accent influences employee outcomes such as job satisfaction and work tension above and beyond role ambiguity and role conflict. Data from 114 Hispanic employees who speak English with an accent supported this prediction. The moderating roles of group identity, self-efficacy, and perceived control in the process were examined. None of the proposed coping mechanism buffered the impact of perceived discrimination based on accent on employee outcomes.
. Richards, David; Bee, Penny; Barkham, Michael; Gilbody,Simon; Cahill, Jane; Glanville, Julie. In their research article “The prevalence of nursing staff stress on adult acute psychiatric in-patient wards” (2006) Concerns about recent changes in acute in-patient mental health care environments have led to fears about staff stress and poor morale in acute in-patient mental health care staff. To review the prevalence of low staff morale, stress, burnout, job satisfaction and psychological well-being amongst staff working in in-patient psychiatric wards. Systematic review. Of 34 mental health studies identified, 13 were specific to acute in-patient settings, and 21 were specific to other non-specified ward-based samples. Most studies did not find very high levels of staff burnout and poor morale but were mostly small, of poor quality and provided incomplete or non-standardized prevalence data. Multi-site, prospective epidemiological studies using validated measures of stress together with personal and organizational variables influencing staff stress in acute in-patient wards are required.

Raidén, Ani Birgit; Dainty, Andrew R. J.; Neale, Richard H. intheir study on “Balancing employee needs, project requirements andorganizational priorities in team deployment” (2006) The ‘people and performance’ model asserts that performance is a sum of employee ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO). Despite extensive evidence of this people-performance link within manufacturing and many service sectors, studies within the construction industry are limited. Thus, a recent research project set out to explore the team deployment strategies of a large construction company with the view of establishing how a balance could be achieved between organisational strategic priorities, operational project requirements and individual employee needs and preferences. It is suggested that a resourcing structure that takes into account the multiple facets of AMO may provide a more effective approach for balancing organisational strategic priorities, operational project requirements and individual employee needs and preferences more appropriately in the future
Noblet, Andrew; LaMontagne, Anthony D. conducted a study on “The role of workplace health promotion in addressing job stress” (2006). The enormous human and economic costs associated with occupational stress suggest that initiatives designed to prevent and/or reduce employee stress should be high on the agenda of workplace health promotion (WHP) programmes. Although employee stress is often the target of WHP, reviews of job stress interventions suggest that the common approach to combating job stress is to focus on the individual without due consideration of the direct impacts of working conditions on health as well as the effects of working conditions on employees’ ability to adopt and sustain ‘healthy’ behaviours. The purpose of the first part of this paper is to highlight the criticisms of the individual approach to job stress and to examine the evidence for developing strategies that combine both individual and organizational-directed interventions (referred to as the comprehensive approach). There is a risk that WHP practitioners may lose sight of the role that they can play in developing and implementing the comprehensive approach, particularly in countries where occupational health and safety authorities are placing much more emphasis on identifying and addressing organizational sources of job stress.
Kushnir, Talma; Melamed, and Samuel in their study titled “Domestic Stress and Well-Being of Employed Women”. (2006)Family researchers have suggested that shared decision control is important for coping with stressful demands at home, whereas occupational stress theorists view personal decision control as an essential coping resource. We studied the effects of home demands, personal decision control, and shared decision control at home on burnout and satisfaction with life, using Karasek’s job-demands-control model to gauge home stress and its outcomes. Participants were 133 mothers employed in secretarial and managerial jobs. We hypothesized that shared control would correlate more strongly with burnout and satisfaction with life than would personal control. In multiple regression analyses, demands had independent main effects on both outcomes. Shared control significantly predicted satisfaction with life, but not burnout, and personal control predicted neither. It is suggested that in families (as in teams), shared decision control may be a more potent coping resource than personal control.
Keeva, and Steven in their article titled “Depression Takes a Toll” (2006) Keeva, and Steven 39 in their article titled Depression Takes a Toll (2006) deal with the high rates of mental depression among lawyers in the U.S. Studies which highlighted the depression problem among lawyers are cited. It discusses the suicide of Judge Mack Kidd of Austin, Texas. It explores the role of occupational stress in depression among lawyers. Jackson, Leon; Rothmann, Sebastiaan 40 in their titled Occupational stress, organisational commitment, and ill-health of educators in the North West Province (2006) discussed to determine the differences between occupational stress and strain of educators in different biographical groups, and to assess the relationship between occupational stress, organizational commitment and ill-health.
Jackson, Leon; Rothmann, Sebastiaan in their titled “Occupational stress, organisational commitment, and ill-health of educators in the North West Province” (2006) discussed to determine the differences between occupational stress and strain of educators in different biographical groups, and to assess the relationship between occupational stress, organizational commitment and ill-health. A sample of 1170 was selected and Organizational Stress Screening Tool and a biographical questionnaire were administered. The results show differences between the occupational stress, organizational commitment and ill-health of educators of different ages, qualifications and associated with different types of schools.
H., Azlihanis A.; L., Naing; D., Aziah B.; N., Rusli in their titled “Socio-demographic, Occupational And Psychosocial Factors Associated With Job Strain Among Secondary School Teachers In Kota Bharu, Kelantan” (2006) The teaching profession is an occupation at high risk for stress. This research attempted to determine the prevalence of stress and the associated factors contributing to stress among teachers in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 580 secondary school teachers in Kota Bharu District. The instrument used to carry out the study was adopted and modified from the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS 21) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The questionnaire consisted of two parts: Part I consisting non-job factors (socio-demographic characteristics) and Part II consisting of psychosocial factors contributing to stress. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis were carried out. The prevalence of stress was reported as 34.0%. Seventeen point four percent of teachers experienced mild stress. Age, duration of work and psychological job demands were significantly associated with stress level. This study indicates job-related factors did not contribute much to stress among secondary school teachers. Non-job-related factors should be further studied to determine methods for stress reduction in teachers in Malaysia.

Coetzer, and W.J.; Rothmann, S. In their article titled “Occupational stress of employees in an insurance company”, (2006) The objectives of this study were to assess the internal consistency of the ASSET, to identify occupational stressors for employees in an insurance company and to assess the relationships between occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment. A cross-sectional survey design was used. An availability sample (N = 613) of employees in an insurance company was used. An Organisational Stress Screening Tool (ASSET) was used as measuring instrument. The results showed that job insecurity as well as pay and benefits were the highest stressors in the insurance industry. Two stressors, namely job characteristics and control were statistically significant predictors of low organisational commitment. Physical ill health was best predicted by overload and job characteristics. Three stressors, namely work-life balance, overload and job characteristics best predicted psychological ill health.
Botha, Christo; Pienaar, and Jaco in their titled “South African correctional official occupational stress: The role of psychological strengths” (2006) The objective of this study was to determine the dimensions of occupational stress of employees of the Department of Correctional Services in a management area of the Freestate Province of South Africa. A further objective was to investigate the role of psychological strengths, namely, work locus of control and affect, in the experience of occupational stress. A cross-sectional design was used. A simple random sample (n = 157) was taken. The correctional officer stress inventory was developed by means of factor analysis, and the work locus of control scale and the affectometer two were administered. Results indicated that an external locus of control and negative affect contribute to the experience of occupational stress. The most severe stressors for correctional officials have to do with a lack of resources.
Bernhart, and Molly in their article, “Work intensity showing up in stress, employee attrition”, (2006) focused the intensification of work by employers to increase productivity with fewer employees, where human A great deal of fear is now creeping into the workplace and there’s a good reason for it. We’re running out of younger, skilled, entry-level workers.” – Edward Gordon, president of Imperial Consulting and author of “The 2010 Meltdown: Solving the Impending Job Crisis.”This is not a new observation. Experts have been spreading theories on an impending skills gap left by retiring baby boomers for some time now. But the Society for Human Resource Management’s 2006 Workplace Forecast shows that HR professionals are taking such warnings seriously. SHRM’s report shows the graying employee population is the most important demographic 2006. Those surveyed say the aging workforce, retirement of a large number of baby boomers around the same time and demographic shifts leading to a shortage of skilled workers are some of the issues likely to have a major impact on the workplace. When the employee forecast was consolidated into a list of top 10 trends, one could have predicted rising health care costs, retirement of baby boomers and outsourcing to make the list, but one new trend was not so predictable: “Work intensification as employers try to increase
Barzilai-Pesach, Vered; Sheiner, Einat K.; Sheiner, Eyal; Potashnik, Gad; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana in their research work titled “TheEffect of Women’s Occupational Psychologic Stress on Outcome of Fertility Treatments”, (2006) The objective of this study was to examine the possible association between women’s occupational stress and outcome of fertility treatments. A prospective cohort study was performed, including a consecutive group of 75 working women with a female fertility problem attending fertility clinics between the years 1999 and 2000. A structured questionnaire measuring burnout, job strain, and job satisfaction was used. Workload was assessed by number of working hours and shift work. Women who perceived their job as more demanding were less likely to conceive (relative risk RR, 0.6; 95% confidence interval CI = 0.42-0.96). Actual workload, measured by full-time versus part-time job, was found among women who conceived to be significantly associated with less likelihood to successfully complete a pregnancy (RR, 0.3; 95% CI = 0.11-0.96). An inverse association was found between perceived higher workload and conceiving. The likelihood to deliver after fertility treatment was associated with less working hours.

Akerboom, and S.; Maes S. in their paper titled “Beyond demand and control: The contribution of organizational risk factors in assessing the psychological well-being of health care employees.”, (2006) The job demand–control(–support) model is frequently used as a theoretical framework in studies on determinants of psychological well-being. Consequently, these studies are confined to the impact of job characteristics on worker outcomes. In the present study the relation between work conditions and outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, psychological distress, and somatic complaints) is examined from a broader organizational perspective. This paper reports on an analysis that examines both the unique and the additional contribution of organizational characteristics to well-being indicators, beyond those attributed to job characteristics. A total of 706 care staff from three public residential institutions for people with mental or physical disabilities in the Netherlands took part in this research. To assess organizational risk factors a measurement instrument was developed, the organizational Risk Factors Questionnaire (ORFQ), based on the safety-critical factors of the Tripod accident causation model. Factor analyses and reliability testing resulted in a 52-item scale consisting of six reliable sub-scales: staffing resources, communication, social hindrance, training opportunities, job skills, and material resources.
Yates, and Iva in their research work titled “Reducing Occupational Stress”, (2005) the survey explains in detail that 40% of worker in a manufacturing company reported that their job was very stressful and another 25% expressed that this job was extremely increasing the stress towards their family life, this survey has identified various job conditions that can be adopted to maintain a stress less work life which leads to a stress less family life.
Stetz,Thomas A.; Stetz, Melba C.; Bliese, Paul D. In their article titled “The importance of self-efficacy in the moderating effects of social support on stressor–strain relationships” (2005) Occupational stress research offers inconsistent findings on the moderating effects of social support on the stressor–strain relationship. This study contributes to the research literature by examining how social support’s moderating effect is dependent on one’s self-efficacy. Ninety-six US military police soldiers completed two surveys 3 months apart. The results showed that three out of four regression equations had significant three-way interactions. Organizational constraints supervisor support self-efficacy had statistically significant interactions in the prediction of job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Organizational constraints co-worker support self-efficacy had a significant interaction in the predicted of psychological well-being. These interactions explained between 5% and 10% of the variance in the dependent variables. Social support buffered the stressor–strain relationship when self-efficacy was high and reverse buffered the relationship when self-efficacy was low. These results indicate that interventions aimed at reducing strains by increasing social support should consider an individual’s self-efficacy. Future research should consider incorporating content of communication to determine if high and low self-efficacy individuals receive or react differently to different types of communication contents.

CHAPTER III
COMPANY PROFILE
Introduction about the sugar Industry
Sugar industry is the largest agro-based industry located in the rural India about 45 million sugarcane farmers, their dependents and large mass of agricultural laborer are involved in sugarcane cultivation, harvesting, and ancillary activities, sand constituting 7.5 % of the rural population. Besides, about 0.5 million skilled and semi skilled workers, mostly from the rural areas are engaged in the sugar industry. The sugar industry in India has been a focal point for socio-economic development in the rural areas by mobilizing rural resources, generating employment and higher income, transport and communication facilities.
Profile of Kothari sugars and Chemicals Limited, Kattur:
Kothari Sugar and Chemicals Ltd is one of the pioneers in manufacturing of sugar in India. They are also engaged in co-generation of power, production of Industrial alcohol from molasses and bio-compost from press mud and distillery effluents. In the early 1960s the foundation stone for the first factory at Kattur was laid by the Chief Minister of Tamilnadu. Mr. PerunthalaivarKamarajar’ and was inaugurated by Union Minister for food and Agriculture Mr. SK Patel” Today they operate a total capacity of 10000 TCD across 3 manufacturing units.
In addition to sugar manufacturing, they are also engaged in co-generation of power, production of Industrial alcohol from molasses and bio-compost from press mud and distillery effluents.

The Kattur unit, located in Kattur Village of Trichy District, is about 30 Km from Trichy and 6 Km from Lalgudi railway station. In addition to sugar production, this unit also has facilities for co-generation of power, distillery and bio-compost.

The sugar factory was initially commissioned with a crushing capacity of 1250 TCD. Subsequence the capacity was raised to 1500 TCD during 1968-69. In 1974-75 the capacity was increased 2000 TCD and by 1985-86 it achieved 2500 TCD. It was expanded to its current capacity of 2900 TCD during 1994-95, which demonstrates the commitment to continue improvement.

To strengthen the business model and values, a co-generation Unit with 11 MW was commissioned in 1996 and a Distillery plant with a production capacity of 45 KLPD Rectified Spirit which is inclusive of 10 KLPD extra Neutral Alcohol was commissioned in 1993.

Corporate philosophy:
The intent is to stay focused and establish a leadership position in each of the businesses globally.

Guiding Principles:
Care for the customers and employees
Create a culture of sharing and openness
Utilize technology to facilitate information flow
Invest in environmental protection
Establish complementary joint ventures and partnerships
Promote community health and education
The Future:
As long as innovation, excellence and meaningful growth are values worthy of attainment, they shall march on inexorably in their pursuit, towards a better, brighter, happier tomorrow.
The following main social objectives are being achieved:
To bring out
To provide social and economic security to farming community.
To prevent the movement of rural families to urban for education of children
VALUES OF THE COMPANY
Mission:
“To establish a leadership position in the chosen businesses by exceeding customer expectation, by providing employees a productive and enjoyable work and family environment, and by delivering superior returns to the shareholders”.

“To make the best use of the natural and other available resources with socio–economic responsibilities, by following highest quality standard and continuous benchmarking, to create stakeholders delight by developing a sustainable, scalable and ethically sound global organization”.

Vision:
By 2015,to position ourselves among the top 5 profitable sugar companies in India by creating value through investment in customers, supplies, employers, products, processes, technology and innovation.

Main objectives that are supporting the mission:
A sustainable and scalable organization
Best use of natural resources
Follow highest quality standard and continuous benchmarking
Follow good business ethic
Socio economic responsibility
Maximize the stakeholder’s value.

Core values:
Manufacturing products by the following Highest Quality Standards
Selling the best products available
Providing Growth and prosperity for the employees
Following good business ethics with associates
Winning customer’s trust
Creating wealth thought profits and growth
Various departments:
There are five major departments at Kothari sugars and chemicals limited Kattur. They are:
Cane department:
This department is concentrating in getting sugar canes from the farmers, through the registration and proper cultivation of sugarcane level by proper guidance to the sugarcane cultivators.

Accounts department:
Manufacturing department:
This department is concentrating on sugar manufacturing process.
The Kothari Sugars Chemicals Limited, Kattur, manufacturing S30 Sugar crystals by crushing of sugarcane to get sugar crystals.

2.Personnel and Administration Department:
The administrative department is performing the general administrative functions of the organizations.

The personnel department plays the personnel functions like, HRP, recruitment, selection, public relation, configuration, accepting resignations, terminations, retirement and transfer order issuing, co-ordinate with other departments, collective bargaining and negotiations, issuing work orders, maintaining attendance and so on.

Quality control:
The personnel and Administration Department also concentrates more on maintaining the quality of the sugar crystals has S 30 and following the guidelines of ICCUMSA to maintain ICCLUMSA
4. Engineering:
This plant facilitates co-generation of 33 MV (Mega Waltz) of “Green Energy”(Power) from Bagasse exemplifies their commitment to reduction of global warming. The produced poer is utilized in all the units of the factory including the schools, quarters, and the excess power is exported to Tamilnadu Electricity board (TNEB) grid at a cost of Rs.2.75 per unit. The raw material used for this plant is BAGASSE, which is the waste product from sugar after the extraction of juice from sugarcane.

5. Processor:
The processor Unit, with a capacity of 60 LLPD, is equipped to produce Anhydrous Recruited spirit, Natural Spirit, head spirit and fused oil. The waste product produced form the sugar unit called “molasses” is used as the raw material in the distillery unit. There are Rectified plant and natural plant.

Work force:
The total employees employed at Kothari sugars and Chemicals limited, skilled, semi skilled, unskilled, highly skilled staff and executives.

CHAPTER – IV
DATA ANALYSIS ; INTERPRETATION
Table No .4.1
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Age
Age Frequency Percent
18 -20 years 16 16.0
21-30 years 60 60.0
31-40 years 14 14.0
41 -50 years 10 10.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 60 % of the respondents are in the age group of 21 to 30 years, 16 % of the respondents are in the age group of 18 to 20 years, 14% of the respondents are in the age group of 30 to 40 years and the remaining 10 % of the respondents are in the age group of 40 to 50 years.It is understood that maximum 60% of the respondents are belonging to the age group of 21-30 years.

Chart No .4.1
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Age

Table No .4.2
Gender Based Classification of the Respondents
S. No Gender Frequency Percent
Male 66 66.0
Female 34 34.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 66% of the respondents are male. 34% of the respondents are female. It is found that maximum 66% of the respondents are male.

Chart No .4.2
Gender Based Classification of the Respondents

Table No .4.3
Classification Based On the Marital Status of the Respondents
S. No Marital status Frequency Percent
Married 78 78.0
Single 22 22.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that maximum 78% of the respondents are married people. Remaining 22% of the respondents are single. It is understood that maximum 78% of the respondents are married people.

Chart No .4.3
Classification Based On the Marital Status of the Respondents

Table No .4.4
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Educational Qualification
Educational qualification Frequency Percent
H.S.C 58 58.0
Degree 19 19.0
Master Degree 13 13.0
Others 10 10.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that maximum 58% of the respondents are having educational qualification of H.S.C. 19%’ of the respondents are having educational qualification of Degree. 13% of the respondents are having educational qualification of Master Degree. 10% of the respondents are having educational qualification of Others. It is understood that maximum 58% of the respondents are having educational qualification of H.S.C.

CHART NO .4.4
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Educational Qualification

Table No .4.5
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Income
Income Frequency Percent
10000-20000 68 68.0
20001-30000 18 18.0
Above 30000 14 14.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that maximum 68% of the respondents are getting the income of Rs10000-20000 and above. 18% of the respondents are getting the income of Rs20001-30000consists. 14% of the respondents are getting the income Rs 30000 & above
It is concluded that maximum 68% of the respondents are getting income of Rs 10000-20000
Chart No .4.5
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Income

Table No .4.6
Classification of Respondents Based On Their job division
Family Frequency Percent
Production 40 40.0
Purchase 10 10.0
Sales 20 20.0
Maintenance 30 30.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that maximum 40% of the respondents where belongs to production unit. 30% of the respondents are from maintenance unit, 20% of the respondents are from sales unit. And finally 10% of the respondents are from purchase unit. It is noted that maximum 40% of the respondents are from production unit.

Chart No .4.6
Classification of Respondents Based On Their job division

Table No .4.7
Classification of Respondents Based On Their work experience
Residential status Frequency Percent
Below 2 yrs 12 12.0
3-5 yrs 20 20.0
6-10 yrs 48 48.0
Above 10 yrs 20 20.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table portrays that 48% of the respondents are having the work experience of 6-10 years. 20% of the respondents are having 3-5 years. 20% of the respondents are having above 10 years .12% of the respondents are living having below 2 years.

It is perceived that maximum 48% of the respondents are having 6-10 years work experience.

Chart No .4.7
Classification of Respondents Based On Their work experience

Table No .4.8
Classification of Respondents Based On the distance
S. No Distance No. of Respondents Percentage
Nearby 39 39.0
1-4 kms31 31.0
5 to 10 kms21 21.0
Above 10 kms09 9.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 39% of the respondents are living nearby. 31% of the respondents are coming from 1-4 kms distance. 21% of the respondents are coming from 5-10 kms distance. .and only 9% of the respondents is coming from above 10 kms distance.

It is understood that maximum 39% of the respondents are coming from nearby.

Chart No .4.8
Classification of Respondents Based on distance

Table No .4.9
Classification of Respondents Based On Mode of Transports
SnoMode of transports No. of Respondents Percentage
1 Bicycle/By walk 23 23.0
2 Two wheeler 33 33.0
3 Car 05 05.0
4 Bus 24 24.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that maximum 33% of the respondents are using two-wheeler as mode of transport.24% of the respondents are using bus as mode of transport 23% of the respondents are coming by walk, only 5% of the respondents are using car as a mode of transport.

It is understood that maximum 33% of the respondents are using two-wheeler as mode of transport. To reach the company.Chart No – 4.9
Classification of Respondents Based On Their Mode of Transport

Table No .4.10
Opinion of the respondents about “the satisfaction level of their job”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 32 32.0
Agree 16 16.0
Neutral 12 12.0
Disagree 10 10.0
Strongly disagree 3 3.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 32% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that satisfied in their job. 16% of the respondents agree with the statement satisfied in their job. 12% of the respondents neutral with the statement that not satisfied in their job. 10% of the respondents disagree with the statement that satisfied in their job. 3 % of the respondents are strongly disagree with the statement that satisfied in their job
It is understood that maximum 48% of the respondents agree with the statement that ‘Satisfaction with the Job”
Chart No .4.10
Opinion of the respondents about “the satisfaction level of their job”

Table No – 4.11
Opinion of the respondents about “Expectations of the employees were completely met by the organization”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 23 23
Agree 31 31
Neutral 09 09
Disagree 17 17
Strongly disagree 10 10
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 31% of the respondents agree with the statement that the expectations of the employees were completely met by the organization .23% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that the expectations of the employees were completely met by the organization. 17% of the respondents disagree with the statement that the expectations of the employees were not completely met by the organization. 10% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement that the expectations of the employees were not completely met by the organization. 9% of the respondents are Neutral with the statement that the expectations of the employees were completely met by the organization
It is understood that maximum 54% of the respondents agree with the statement that the expectations were completely met by the organization.

Chart No – 4.11
Opinion of the respondents about “Expectations of the employees were completely met by the organization”

Table No – 4.12
Opinion of the respondents about “stress affects personal and professional life”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 30 30
Agree 33 33
Neutral 11 11
Disagree 14 14
Strongly disagree 12 12
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 33% of the respondents agree with the statement that the stress affects the personal & professional life. 30% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that the stress affects the personal & professional life. 14% of the respondents disagree with the statement that the stress affects the personal & professional life. 12% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement thatthe stress affects the personal & professional life. 11% of the respondents are Neutral with the statement that the stress affects the personal & professional life
It is understood that maximum 63% of the respondents agree with the statement that the stress affects the personal & professional life.

Chart No – 4.12
Opinion of the respondents about “stress affects personal and professional life”

Table No – 4.13
Opinion of the respondents about “recreational activities reduce stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 21 21
Agree 25 25
Neutral 12 12
Disagree 27 27
Strongly disagree 15 15
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 27% of the respondents disagree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress. 25% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress. 21% of the respondents disagree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress. 15% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress. 12% of the respondents are Neutral with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress
It is understood that maximum 46% of the respondents agree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress.

Table No – 4.13
Opinion of the respondents about “recreational activities reduce stress”

Table No – 4.14
Opinion of the respondents about “Experience of stress in job”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 33 33
Agree 31 31
Neutral 09 09
Disagree 15 15
Strongly disagree 12 12
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 33% of the respondents agree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job. 31% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job. 15% of the respondents disagree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job. 12% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job. 9% of the respondents Neutral with the statement that they experienced stress in their job
It is understood that maximum 64% of the respondents agree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job.

Chart No – 4.14
Opinion of the respondents about “Experience of stress in job

Table No – 4.15
Opinion of the respondents about “work environment creates stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
Strongly agree 29 19
Agree 27 17
Neutral 15 15
Disagree 11 21
Strongly disagree 18 28
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table reveals that 29% of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that the work environment creates stress. 27% of the respondents agree with the statement that the work environment creates stress. 18% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement the work environment creates stress. 15% of the respondents are Neutral with the statement that the work environment creates stress 11% of the respondents strongly disagree with the statement that the work environment creates stress.

It is understood that maximum 56% of the respondents agree with the statement that the work environment creates stress.

Chart No – 4.15
Opinion of the respondents about “work environment creates stress”

Table No – 4.16
Opinion of the respondents about “social injustice creates stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 34 34
Agree 32 32
Neutral 07 07
Disagree 11 11
Strongly disagree 16 16
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 34% of the respondents strongly agree with the view that the social injustice creates stress. 32% of the respondents agree with the view that that the social injustice creates stress. 16% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view that that the social injustice creates stress. 11% of the respondents disagree with the view that that the social injustice creates stress.7% of the respondents are Neutral with the view that that the social injustice creates stress.

It is found that majority of 64% of the respondents agree with the view that that the social injustice creates stress
Chart No – 4.16
Opinion of the respondents about “social injustice creates stress

Table No – 4.17
Opinion of the respondents about “heavy work load creates stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 28 28
Agree 31 31
Neutral 10 10
Disagree 14 14
Strongly disagree 17 17
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 31% of the respondents agree with the view of that heavy work load create stress. 28% of the respondents agree with the view of that heavy work load creates stress. 17% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that heavy work load creates stress. 14% of the respondents disagree with the view of that heavy work load creates stress. 10% of the respondents are Neutral with the view of that heavy work load creates stress.

It is found that majority of 59% of the respondents agree with the view of heavy work load creates stress
Chart No – 4.17
Opinion of the respondents about “heavy work load creates stress”

Table No – 4.18
Opinion of the respondents about “Employer encouragement”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 32 32
Agree 33 33
Neutral 05 05
Disagree 16 16
Strongly disagree 14 14
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 33% of the respondents strongly agree with the view of that their employer encourages them. 32% of the respondents agree with the view of that their employer encourages them. 16% of the respondents disagree with the view of that their employer encourages them. 14% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that their employer encourages them. 5% of the respondents are Neutral with the view of that their employer encourages them.

It is found that majority of 65% of the respondents agree with the view of that their employer encourages them
Chart No – 4.18
Opinion of the respondents about “Employer encouragement”

Table No – 4.19
Opinion of the respondents about “family problem creates stress in job”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 29 29
Agree 31 31
Neutral 09 09
Disagree 14 14
Strongly disagree 17 17
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 31% of the respondents agree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job. 29% of the respondents strongly agree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job. 17% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job. 14% of the respondents disagree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job.9% of the respondents are Neutral with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job.

It is found that majority of 60% of the respondents agree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job.

Chart No – 4.19
Opinion of the respondents about “family problem creates stress in job”

Table No – 4.20
Opinion of the respondents about “financial problem creates stress in job”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 35 35
Agree 37 37
Neutral 07 07
Disagree 10 10
Strongly disagree 11 11
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 37% of the respondents agree with the view of that the financial problem creates stress in their job. 35% of the respondents strongly agree with the view of that the financial problem creates stress in their job. 11% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that the financial problem creates stress in their job. 10% of the respondents disagree with the view of that the financial problem creates stress in their job.7% of the respondents are Neutral with the view of that the financial problem creates stress in their job.

It is found that majority of 60% of the respondents agree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job.

Chart No – 4.20
Opinion of the respondents about “financial problem creates stress in job”

Table No – 4.21
Opinion of the respondents about “inconvenient work hours”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 34 34
Agree 33 33
Neutral 13 13
Disagree 10 10
Strongly disagree 10 10
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 34% of the respondents strongly agree with the inconvenient Working hours create stress. 33% of the respondents agree with the view of that the inconvenient Working hours create stress. 13% of the respondents Neutral with the view of that the inconvenient working hours create stress 10% of the respondents disagree with the view of that the inconvenient Working hours create stress. 10% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that the inconvenient Working hours create stress.

It is found that majority (67%) of the respondents agree with the view of that the inconvenient Working hours create stress.

Chart No – 4.21
Opinion of the respondents about “inconvenient work hours”

Table No – 4.22
Opinion of the respondents about “improper grievance handling gives stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 32 32
Agree 26 26
Neutral 04 04
Disagree 22 22
Strongly disagree 16 16
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 32% of the respondents strongly agree with the improper grievance handling gives stress. 26% of the respondents agree with the view of that improper grievance handling gives stress. 22% of the respondents disagree with the view of that improper grievance handling gives stress. 16% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that improper grievance handling gives stress 4% of the respondents were Neutral with the view of that improper grievance handling gives stress.

It is found that majority of 58% of the respondents agree with the view of that improper grievance handling gives stress.

Chart No – 4.22
Opinion of the respondents about “improper grievance handling gives stress”

Table No – 4.23
Opinion of the respondents about “Employee satisfaction survey”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 30 30
Agree 31 31
Neutral 07 07
Disagree 13 13
Strongly disagree 19 19
Total 100 100
Source: primary data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 31% of the respondents agree with the statement that the employee satisfaction survey conducted by the organization. 30% of the respondents strongly agree with the view that the employee satisfaction survey conducted by the organization. 19% of the respondents disagree with the view that the employee satisfaction survey conducted by the organization.13% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view that the employee satisfaction survey conducted by the organization.

It is found that majority of 61% of the respondents agree with the view that the employee satisfaction survey conducted by the organization
Chart No – 4.23
Opinion of the respondents about “Employee satisfaction survey”

Table No – 4.24
Opinion of the respondents about “organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase productivity”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 29 29
Agree 39 39
Neutral 06 06
Disagree 10 10
Strongly disagree 16 16
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 39% of the respondents agree with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity. 29% of the respondents strongly agree with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity. 16% of the respondents disagree with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity. 10% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity. 6% of the respondents are Neutral with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity.

It is found that majority of 68% of the respondents agree with the view of that the organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase the productivity
Chart No – 4.24
Opinion of the respondents about “organization should assist their employees to manage their stress to increase productivity”

Table No – 4.25
Opinion of the respondents about “physiological problem creates stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
Strongly agree 38 38
Agree 30 30
Neutral 10 10
Disagree 12 12
Strongly disagree 10 10
Total 100 100
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above table shows that 38% of the respondents agree with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress. 30% of the respondents strongly agree with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress. 12% of the respondents disagree with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress. 10% of the respondents strongly disagree with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress. 10% of the respondents are neutral with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress
It is found that majority of 68% of the respondents agree with the view of that the physiological problem gives stress.

Chart No – 4.25
Opinion of the respondents about “physiological problem creates stress”

Table No – 4.26
Opinion of the respondents about “less income creates stress”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
1 Strongly agree 38 38.0
2 Agree 32 32.0
3 Neutral 10 10.0
4 Disagree 11 11.0
5 Strongly disagree 9 9.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The above tables reveals that 38% respondents strongly agree the statement that less income creates stress .32% respondents agree the statement that less income creates stress.11 % respondents disagree the statement that less income creates stress.

10 %respondents are expressed Neutral about the statement that less income creates stress and the Remaining 9 % respondents strongly disagree the statement that less income creates stress
It is perceived that maximum 70% respondents agree the statement that less income creates stress.

Chart No – 4.26
Opinion of the respondents about “less income creates stress”

Table No – 4.27
Opinion of the respondents about “healthy and safety working environment”
S. No Level of Agreed No. of Respondents Percentage
(%)
1 Strongly agree 33 33.0
2 Agree 39 39.0
3 Neutral 11 11.0
4 Disagree 11 11.0
5 Strongly disagree 6 6.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The table reveals that 39% respondents agree the statement that healthy and safety working environment .33%respondents agree the statement that healthy and safety working environment. 11% respondents disagree the statement that healthy and safety working environment .11% respondents are expressed neutral about the statement that healthy and safety working environment .and Remaining 6 respondents disagree the statement that healthy and safety working environment.

It is perceived that maximum 72% respondents agree the statement that healthy and safety working environment.

Chart No – 4.27
Opinion of the respondents about “health and safety working environment”

Table No – 4.28
Opinion of the respondents about “Employees inadequate compensation creates stress”
S.NoParticulars Frequency Percentage
1 Strongly agree 33 33.0
2 Agree 37 37.0
3 Neutral 12 12.0
4 Disagree 10 10.0
5 Strongly disagree 8 8.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The table reveals that 37% respondents agree with the statement that Employee inadequate compensation creates stress.33% respondents are expressed strongly agree with the statement that “Employee inadequate compensation creates stress.12% respondents are expressed neutral with the statement that ” Employee inadequate compensation creates stress., 10% respondents Disagree with the statement that “Employee inadequate compensation creates stress . And Remaining 8% respondents strongly disagree with the statement that “Employee inadequate compensation creates stress.

It is perceived that maximum 70% of the respondents agree with the statement that “Employee inadequate compensation creates stress.

Chart No – 4.28
Opinion of the respondents about “Employees inadequate compensation creates stress”

Table No – 4.29
Opinion of the respondents about “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey”
S.NoParticulars Frequency Percentage
1 Strongly agree 26 26.0
2 Agree 29 29.0
3 Neutral 7 7.0
4 Disagree 20 20.0
5 Strongly disagree 18 18.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The table reveals that 29% respondents agree with the statement that “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey.26% respondents are expressed strongly agree the statement that beneficial of employee satisfaction survey. 20% respondents disagree the statements that “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey.” 18% respondents strongly disagree the statement that “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey and Remaining 7% respondents are expressed neutral the statement that “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey
It is perceived that maximum 55% of the respondents agree the statements that “beneficial of employee satisfaction survey.

Chart No – 4.29
Opinion of the respondents about “benefits of employee satisfaction survey”

Table No – 4.30
Opinion of the respondents about “panic under stressful situation”
S.NoParticulars Frequency Percentage
1 Strongly agree 26 26.0
2 Agree 29 29.0
3 Neutral 7 7.0
4 Disagree 20 20.0
5 Strongly disagree 18 18.0
Total 100 100.0
Source: Primary Data
Interpretation:
The table reveals that 29% respondents agree with the statement that “panic under stressful situation.26% respondents are expressed strongly agree the statement that panic under stressful situation. 20% respondents disagree the statements that “panic under stressful situation.” 18% respondents strongly disagree the statement that “panic under stressful situation.” and Remaining 7 respondents are expressed neutral the statement that “panic under stressful situation.

It is perceived that maximum 55% of the respondents agree the statements that “panic under stressful situation.

Chart No – 4.30
Opinion of the respondents about “panic under stressful situation”

Stress Coping Strategies Test
Association between gender of the respondents and their having Stress Coping Strategies
Gender Using Stress Coping Strategies Statistical inference
Yes No Total n % N % N % X2=84.051
Df=1
.000<0.05
Significant
Male 62 100.0% 4 10.5% 66 66.0% Female 0 .0% 34 89.5% 34 34.0% Total 62 100.0% 38 100.0% 100 100.0% Research hypothesis (H0): There is no significant association between gender of the respondents and their having Stress Coping Strategies.

Chi-square test table reveals that there is significant association between gender of the respondents and their having Stress Coping Strategies. The calculated value is less than table value (.000<0.05). The research hypothesis is rejected.

Association between “the satisfaction level of their job” of the respondents and their havingStress Coping Strategies.

Level of Agreed Using Stress Coping Strategies. Statistical inference
Yes No Total n % n % n % Strongly agree 32 51.6% 0 .0% 32 32.0% X2=100.000
Df=4
.000<0.05
Significant
Agree 0 .0% 16 42.1% 16 16.0% Neutral 0 .0% 12 31.6% 12 12.0% Disagree 0 .0% 10 26.3% 10 10.0% Strongly disagree 30 48.4% 0 .0% 30 30.0% Total 62 100.0% 38 100.0% 100 100.0% Research hypothesis (H0): There is no significant association between the satisfaction level of their job of the respondents and their having Stress Coping Strategies.

Chi-square test table reveals that there is significant association between the satisfaction level of their job of the respondents and their having Stress Coping Strategies. The calculated value is less than table value (.000<0.05). The research hypothesis is rejected.

Association between family income of the respondents and their having stress coping strategies
Family income Using stress coping strategies Statistical inference
Yes No Total n % n % n % Rs.10000 to 20000 62 100.0% 6 15.8% 68 68.0% X2=76.780
Df=1
.000<0.05
Significant
Rs.20001 to 30000 0 .0% 18 47.4% 18 18.0% Above Rs.3000 0 .0% 14 36.8% 14 14.0% Total 62 100.0% 38 100.0% 100 100.0% Research hypothesis (H0): There is no significant association between family income of the respondents and their having stress coping strategies.

Chi-square test table reveals that there is significant association between family income of the respondents and their having stress coping strategies. The calculated value is less than table value (.000<0.05). The research hypothesis is rejected.

T-Test
Difference between using stress coping strategies and their opinion about the gender
Opinion of about the gender of stress coping strategies n Mean S.D Statistical inference
Yes 62 4.00 .000 t=1.634 Df=98
0.105>0.05
Not Significant
No 38 3.79 1.018 Research hypothesis (H0): There is no significant difference between using stress coping strategies and their opinion about the gender.

‘t’ test table reveals that there is no significant difference between using stress coping strategies and their opinion about the gender. The calculated value is greater than table value (.105>0.05). The research hypothesis is accepted.

Oneway ANOVA difference between family income and their opinion about the service
Opinion Of Respondents About Service Of The Stress Coping Strategies n Mean S.D SS DfMS Statistical inference
Between Groups .247 2 .124 F=0.201
.818>0.05
Not Significant
Rs.10000 to 100000 68 3.79 .407 Rs.100001 to 200000 18 3.89 1.023 Above Rs.200001 14 3.71 1.541 Within Groups 59.753 97 .616 Research hypothesis (H0): There is no significant difference between family income and their opinion about the service.

Oneway ANOVA ‘f’ test table reveals that there is no significant difference between family income and their opinion about the service. The calculated value is greater than table value (.818>0.05). The research hypothesis is accepted.

Chapter – V
Findings, Suggestions & Conclusion
5.1 FINDINGS
Summary of findings are.

The study finds Maximum (60%) of the respondents are belongs to the age group of 21-30 years. And maximum (66%) of the respondents are male.

The study finds maximum (78%) of the respondents are married people
The study finds maximum (58%) of the respondents are having educational qualification up to H.S.C
It is concluded that maximum (40%) of the respondents are getting income of Rs 10000-20000 and 68% of the respondents are from production unit.

It is perceived that maximum 48% of the respondents are having 6-10 years work experience. 39% of the respondents are coming from nearby. and Nearly 33% of the respondents are using two-wheeler as mode of transport to reach the company.

The study finds that maximum (32%) of the respondents strongly agree with the statement that ‘Satisfaction with the Job” 16% of the respondents agree with the statement that the expectations were completely met by the organization
The study finds that 63% of the respondents agree with the statement that the stress affects the personal ; professional life. and 46% of the respondents agree with the statement that the recreational activities reduce stress.

The study finds maximum (64%) of the respondents agree with the statement that they experienced stress in their job. And 56% of the respondents agree with the statement that the work environment creates stress.

The study finds that majority of 64% of the respondents agree with the view that that the social injustice creates stress and 59% of the respondents agree with the view of heavy work load creates stress.

The study finds that majority (60%) of the respondents agree with the view of that the family problem creates stress in their job. And 67% of the respondents agree with the view of that the inconvenient Working hours create stress.

5.2 SUGGESTIONS
Managing stress is all about taking charge: taking charge of your thoughts, your emotions, your schedule, your environment, and the way you deal with problems. The ultimate goal is a balanced life, with time for work, relationships, relaxation, and fun – plus the resilience to hold up under pressure and meet challenges head on. Thus these are some of the suggestions which will help the respondents in future. They are as follows
Reduce job stress by taking care of yourself
When stress at work interferes with the ability to perform, and adversely impacts health, it’s time to take action.

Start by paying attention to physical and emotional health.

The better one feels, the better equipped one will be to manage work stress without becoming overwhelmed.

STEPS TO RELIEVE STRESS AT WORK
Here are some tips that will help you achieve success over stress. You can reduce stress on the job.

When making phone calls, as you pick up the phone and dial, take three slow deep breaths. Concentrate on pushing tension out of your lungs as you exhale.

Sit down to eat. (Do not eat while standing or driving in your car) Focus on relaxing and enjoyable talk at lunchtime. If co-workers only insist on rehashing all of the negative stuff at work, insist on eating alone.

When you drive your car to your business or your job, listen to something enjoyable or motivating.

On the way to home from your business or your job, listen to enjoyable or relaxing music.

Take a few minutes each day to thank God, in whatever form is consistent with your belief system, for the glorious sunrise. At sunset, do the same. If you are at work while the sun is setting, take a quick break to watch the sun set and again, thank your concept of “God” for the glorious sunset.

CONCLUSION
In this difficult economy, many of us are finding it harder than ever to cope with stress in the workplace. Regardless of occupation, seniority, or salary level, we are spending more and more of our work days feeling frazzled and out of control, instead of alert and relaxed.

Since job and workplace stress increase in times of economic crisis, it is important to learn new and better ways of coping with the pressure. Emotions are contagious, and stress has an impact on the quality of interactions with others. The better an employee is at managing stress, the more he/she will positively affect those around him/her, and the less other people’s stress will negatively affect employees. Thus there are a variety of steps which any organization can resort to, to reduce both overall stress levels and the stress which employees face on the job and in the workplace.