Jack London

Jack London, who is also known as John Griffith Chaney, was one of the most famous American writers of the nineteenth century literature. He was born on January 12, 1876 in San Francisco, California. His father, who was believed to be William Chaney, had left his mother, Flora Wellman, before he was delivered. His surname, London, was taken from his step father, John London, who was married to his mother immediately after his birth. When he was fourteen, he dropped out of school due to financial problems. As a result, he had to work different jobs to earn money, then, he started his adventures. It was not until 1893 in which he was on a sea voyage to Japan that he began writing. After coming back from the voyage, Jack received his education by his own efforts at public libraries. At the age of 19, he became a student of University of California in Berkeley after one year he spent finishing a four-year high school course. One year later, he quitted school, made a journey to the North and became a gold miner in the Klondie; however, he gained nothing but numerous experiences that were brought into his stories and novels later on. During his writing career, he completed more than 50 books and a great number of short stories. Many of those works were extremely successful, especially ones written about dogs, which made Jack London become the best known and the highest-paid author of his time