June 18

June 18, 1812
I had just received official news today, that word is out we are going to war with the Americans. America had declared war with Great Britain and we are sending troops and recruiting soldiers immediately. All men and young boys aged 12 and up are required to fight alongside with Britain.

July 24, 1812
Many families are fleeing to British North America because of their sons turning of age and many people don’t want young children fighting in such a brutal war. Some people might have to fight against some of their close relatives as well and therefore are leaving to start a new life.

September 15, 1812
My husband James has left me today to go and fight in the battle of Queenston Heights against the Americans and I am left alone to take care of the household .

September 18, 1812
It has been about three days now from the battle at Queenston Heights and my dear husband has still not returned. We had lost to the Americans and Queenston was currently in the hands of the Americans. I left to go search for James among the dead and wounded in the battlefield, I had found him bleeding from a gunshot wound, I helped him home where I had treated him and helped him recover from his wound.

March 26, 1813
My husband has mostly recovered from his gunshot wound but the War continued.

June 6, 1813
Today some American soldiers had come to my home and had requested dinner. As I served the American soldiers who had requested dinner I attentively listened closely in the other room with my husband as they ate and discussed something about plans on having a surprise attack on a British outpost at DeCew house, which was under Lieutenant James FitzGibbons order. Me and my husband knew that FitzGibbon must be warned about the attack at DeCew house. As James was unable to walk and still recovering from his gunshot wound. I was determined to make the trek to DeCew house myself along the back roads and dangerous American- occupied lands.

June 7, 1813
At the beginning of dawn, I began my very long journey to DeCew house which would take at least 19 hours. The roads I walked in led to the home of my sister-in-law and my half-brother as a told them about my journey my niece Elizabeth decided to accompany me.

June 8, 1813
I continued my voyage the next day. Me and Elizabeth tried to avoid the main roads but had to go through a very difficult path instead. Elizabeth however got exhausted quite easily, after tramping through the fields, bushes and woods she collapsed and I left her at St. Catherine’s. I was left to continue my trek alone. I arrived at a Native camp so tired, starving and exhausted and had demanded the chief of the tribe to immediately take me to British headquarters. As I arrived, I warned the Lieutenant about the surprise attack and told him everything that I overheard when the Americans had came to my house.

June 12, 1813
The First Nations helped the British troops prevent the attack. They also stop the Americans and had made them surrender at the Battle of Beaver Dams successfully.

In 1814
The peace treaty came into play, and the border between the British and the Americans has never seen conflict since