Similar analytical approach can be seen in Richard Hand ‘s analysis of Japanese horror cinema

Similar analytical approach can be seen in Richard Hand ‘s analysis of Japanese horror cinema, where he notes, for example, that Sadako’s appearance in Ringu is particularly Japanese because “many demonic women in Japanese theatre have long, black hair” (26). Julian Stringer provides an overview of the pan-Asian response to the remake, where the adapted film was criticized for its “Hollywood storytelling style,” which erased the “mystique” and “unease” of the original, whereby the “creepiness” of Ringu was lost in translation (302). Collette Balmain asserts a correlation between the film’s use of horror and a constitutive Japanese cinematic “syntax of despair, emptiness and isolation.” Nina Martin argues that Japanese horror employs an “aesthetic of the edge” that operates more effectively and subtly to engender a sense of fear.