The Ancient Roman goddess of marriage

The Ancient Roman goddess of marriage, childbirth and money, Juno was known as the Queen of Gods. She was also the Patron goddess of Rome with the Roman Empire, and part of the Capitoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno, Minerva) having a statue at Capitoline Hill in Rome. Hera, an Ancient Greek goddess, is Juno’s counterpart in Greek, while her Etruscan counterpart is Uni.
Due to Juno being a goddess, she was worshipped and prayed to, often by women, especially when a childbirth was occurring. Many statues of Juno were sculpted by the Ancient Romans to honour her, such as the statue at Capitoline Hill and numerous other statues that have been found and restored. The month of June is named after Juno, and is Juno’s largest impact on modern society.
Statues of Juno show that she was depicted with short, curly hair, a circular crown and often armed with a spear or another Ancient Roman weapon. A goatskin cloak or robes was Juno’s normal attire, and sometimes Juno held a shield, or a patera as they symbolised life to the Ancient Romans.
Out of all Juno’s sacred symbols, peacocks, crowns, cuckoos, lions, cows and pomegranates are the most frequently depicted sacred symbols. Other more uncommon sacred symbols include royal mints, geese, fig trees, thrones and lotuses, though they are still seen in some statues and pictures.
As Juno is a goddess, she had powers in myths about her, written by Ancient Romans. Immortality, (unable to die due to old age) cursing/blessing marriages or childbirths, throwing lightning bolts and protecting Ancient Roman women, fertility, pregnancy, marriages and finances are Juno’s powers, although each myth is different.
Responsible for the name of June, Juno is the Ancient Roman goddess of marriage, and is mainly associated with peacocks.